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The U.S. Department of Labor, Office of Apprenticeship (OA) requires a minimum of 576 contact hours, or the equivalency if competency-based instruction is used, for a four-year (8,000 hr) registered apprenticeship program. For assistance in selecting and sequencing courses for apprenticeship training, please contact us at (616) 234-3009.

Course textbooks information

The GRCC/Tassell M-TEC Construction Trades Electrical Advisory Committee has recommended the following sequence of training:

ELEC 011 (Level I)

ELEC 11 -This course will introduce the 1st year electric apprentice to the electrical field, the apprentice program, OSHA construction and electrical safety rules, electrical theory, basic electrical trade mathematics, hand conduit bending, test equipment, and the National Electrical Code.  

Learning objectives: Upon completion of this class, students will be able to do the following: 

  • State the differences between the types of electricians and the work they do, and understand the State of Michigan Electrical Administrative Laws.
  • Understand and practice OSHA Construction and Electrical safety rules.
  • Explain atomic theory, the laws of charges, and the importance of electrons.
  • Understand and explain the theory and use of magnetism.
  • Explain the relationship of volts, ohms, amps, and watts and how to measure them with a meter.
  • Identify and calculate series, parallel and combination circuits.
  • Demonstrate an ability to use circuit formulas, rules, and electrical math principles.
  • Identify the basics of electrical circuits, and conductor sizing,
  • Understand and install multi-wire branch circuits.
  • Understand and install basic AC circuits, receptacles, and switching systems.

ELEC 021 (Level I continuation)

This course will introduce the 1st year, second semester electric apprentice to  installing and properly sizing, over current protection, motor theory and sizing, transformer operation, electrical junction box sizing, proper grounding and bonding, installation criteria for different wiring methods and conductor sizing using the National Electrical Code. 

Learning Objectives: Upon completion of this class, students will be able to do the following: 

  • Explain OCPD and GFI principles.
  • Understand and explain motor theory, apparent power, and true power.
  • Identify different motor types and how to connect the leads.
  • Identify different types of transformers and explain their operation.
  • Identify and install junction boxes per code requirements.
  • Explain the general layout of the Electrical Code Book and demonstrate how to look things up using key words.
  • Understand and explain wiring methods from chapter 3 in the code book.
  • Understand and explain the installation and termination of grounding and bonding per code.
  • Identify and explain the installation criteria for different wiring methods per code.
  • Identify and demonstrate correct conductor sizing and ampacity rating, using the NEC.

 ELEC 031 (Level II)

This second year, first semester class will introduce the working apprentice electrician to the National Electrical Code (NFPA 70) and how to use it, safety codes, (NFPA 70E) code rules for GFI protection, required branch circuits, sizing feeders for residential and commercial buildings, sizing over-current devices in different settings and installation requirements for devices. 

Learning Objectives: Upon completion of this class, students will be able to do the following: 

  • Understand and discuss OSHA Electrical Safety requirements for working with live parts and entering confined space.
  • Understand the intent and purpose of NEC.
  • Understand and carry out the various code terms and definitions described in NEC Article 100.
  • Understand and install electrical items per clearances provided in the code.
  • Describe and install branch circuits per NEC code requirements.
  • Identify specific Branch Circuit requirements per the NEC for overcurrent protection, cord connected loads, and GFI protection.
  • Calculate Service feeders, OCPD, and protective equipment for indoor and outdoor applications.
  • Calculate and install devices per NEC layouts.

ELEC 041 (Level II continuation)

This second year, second semester class will introduce the working apprentice electrician to NEC code and code calculations regarding: parallel conductors, conductor ampacity, proper installation criteria, voltage drop, conduit installation, and all raceways listed in chapter 3 of the NEC  

Learning Objectives: Upon completion of this class, students will be able to do the following: 

  • List and apply the rules for parallel conductors, conductor ampacity, adjustment factors and demand factors.
  • Discuss and list proper NEC rules regarding gaps around objects and how to fix them.
  • Understand how to install wiring systems in wet & damp locations.
  • Identify, install, and size metal and non-metallic boxes in surface and recessed situations.
  • Calculate and understand conductor ampacity.
  • Understand and calculate voltage drop.
  • Review and understand conduit securing and conductor sizing.
  • Identify and understand how to calculate, raceway, cable tray, duct, and other chapter 3 wiring methods sizes.

 ELEC 051 (Level III)

This third year, first semester class will introduce the working apprentice electrician to advanced AC theory concepts, excavation safety, the importance of harmonics and neutral loads, lighting installation and troubleshooting, electric floor heating systems, how to size motor OCPD, conductors and overloads, Safe and code compliant grounding and bonding per NEC 250  

Learning Objectives: Upon completion of this class, students will be able to do the following: 

  • Understand and practice construction safety in the areas of excavation, material handling and tools.
  • Review and understand general electrical theory, power quality, harmonics, neutral conductors and AC theory.
  • Understand, install and troubleshoot different types of lighting applications and the code rules required for installation.
  • Discuss and demonstrate knowledge of NEC requirements in the NEC chapter 4.
  • Explain the requirements for heating conductors installed in concrete and other masonry floors.
  • Competently calculate motor conductor sizes and overcurrent devices.
  • Understand and competently calculate feeders and overcurrent devices for HVAC units and heating units.
  • Calculate and understand the code requirements for sizing all bonding and grounding conductors per the NEC.

 ELEC 061 (Level III continuation)

This third year, second semester class will introduce the working apprentice electrician to premises grounding paths, NEC chapter 5 Special Occupancies, NEC chapter 6 Special Equipment, NEC chapter 7 Special Occupancies, safe installation of low volt systems and basic symbols for motor controls, interlocking devices and variable speed drives. 

Learning Objectives: Upon completion of this class, students will be able to do the following: 

  • Understand and discuss electrical system design and premises grounding paths.
  • Understand and recognize the meaning locations of “Special Occupancy” per the NEC.
  • Recognize and be familiar with the electrical requirements for patient care and assembly occupancies Listed in NEC chapter 5.
  • Determine the existence of special equipment and understand the NEC code requirements for supplying electrical connections to this equipment per NEC Chapter 6.
  • Understand the special provisions required to install electrical equipment related to pools, hot tubs and spas.
  • Recognize and be familiar with the electrical requirements for the special conditions Listed in NEC chapter 7 (power source classifications, power limited circuits, and video systems.
  • Recognize and adequately identify installation requirements for Chapter 8 Low volt systems.
  • Understand the basic symbols and concepts related to motors, motor controls, interlocking devices and variable speed drives.

ELEC 071 (Level IV)

This fourth year, first semester class will introduce the working apprentice electrician to health safety concerns associated with the electrical trade, types of electrical contractors, takeoffs, blueprint reading, estimating, and a review of the fundamental calculations required to size motor feeds, boxes, raceways, and transformers.

Learning Objectives: Upon completion of this class, students will be able to do the following:

  • Learn and understand the safety aspects, physical, chemical and health hazards associated with being an electrician.
  • State the objectives and purpose of electrical contractors.
  • Recognize and state the difference between estimating and bidding.
  • Determine labor units for a specific task and understand basic estimating “takeoff” practices.
  • Understand profit, and how to set standard rates for construction tasks.
  • Understand and state basic personal branding and leadership qualities required to get to the next level.
  • Understand and have a firm grasp of basic electrical fundamentals, theory and math.
  • Review and understand NEC Articles and motor, box, raceway, and transformer concepts and calculations.

ELEC 081 (Level IV continuation)

This fourth year, second semester class will review advanced conductor and conduit sizing, adjustment factors for ampacity, Motor OCPD calculations, using the chapter Nine Tables in the NEC, basic fire alarm components, transformer configurations and calculations, sizing and calculating dwelling, marina and mobile home service sizes, branch circuits and feeders.

Learning Objectives: Upon completion of this class, students will be able to do the following:

  • Review and show competency in conductor and conduit sizing calculations.
  • Use adjustment factors to size conductors for both branch circuits and feeders.
  • Understand motor conductor, overload and OCPD sizing per the NEC.
  • Demonstrate proficiency in using the tables in chapter nine and Annex C of the code book.
  • Properly and adequately calculate the demand loads for dwellings, commercial and industrial buildings. (Including optional calculations)
  • Identify the components of a basic fire alarm system.
  • Explain calculations required for specialty locations such as mobile home villages and marinas.
  • Explain and understand basic transformer configurations.
  • Review and show competency in all circuit calculations in preparation for the Journeyman’s exam.

TE 103 – Intermediate Technical Mathematics - four credits

 A study of numbers, common and decimal fractions, scientific notation, percentages, ratios, proportions, direct and inverse variation, formulas and their transpositions, linear systems and equations, and quadratic equations. This class is eligible for the Challenge Exam. Students passing the Challenge Exam can receive credits and opt out of coursework. 

EL 260 – National Electric Code - three credits

This class is a study of the application and interpretation of the National Electric Code rules. This course covers the current edition of the NEC in preparation to sit for the State of Michigan Journeyman’s or Master’s electrical licensing exam.

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